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I need to use the Keysight 2002 & HP3456A but i don't know what to do.

Hello People!!

This is the firs time i write here, so i feel glad to do that.

Now I'm working in a Calibration Lab and there we have some high precision multimeters that we use in manual calibrations. So now we need to use the Keysight 2002 and a Hewlett Packard 3456A as multimeters in MET/CAL but we don't know how to do that or where to start.

We'll apreciate all the help you can give us in this thread, and maybe it could be useful for more people around the world.

We are using the last version of METTEAM - MET/CAL.

Best Regards. Have a nice day.

David Mix Fuentes.

DTS's CALIBRATION TEAM.

18 comments

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Dexter

Hi David, glad you could join us. Your questions are kind of vague and a little beyond the scope of this forum but I too recently taught myself Met/Cal and it seems you are at a level where I might be able to help you out. Send me an e-mail and I can help guide you from there. But here are some good places to start. 

1) Manuals - Every instrument that has a communication interface will have a manual that also gives you the command structure for that device. They wouldn't all be the same. Some use IEEE-488-1978, Some use IEEE-488.2-1987, some use a proprietary command structure and others just speak gibberish (glares at the Fluke 725 pre-2.0 firmware). These will be essential when scripting in Met/Cal

 

2) A Met/Cal reference manual. If you are using the newest version, I am told the help files are where the most current manual now exists. Learn the FSC's. These are Function commands that act as shorthand for programming. For example, using your 3458 will not require you to actually send IEEE commands to the unit (so you can put that hefty manual away) because Met/Cal already has an FSC that will send the commands to it for you. Handy!

 

3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc. 

 

4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it. 

 

But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there. 

 

Dexter

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Avatar
Dexter

Hi David, glad you could join us. Your questions are kind of vague and a little beyond the scope of this forum but I too recently taught myself Met/Cal and it seems you are at a level where I might be able to help you out. Send me an e-mail and I can help guide you from there. But here are some good places to start. 

1) Manuals - Every instrument that has a communication interface will have a manual that also gives you the command structure for that device. They wouldn't all be the same. Some use IEEE-488-1978, Some use IEEE-488.2-1987, some use a proprietary command structure and others just speak gibberish (glares at the Fluke 725 pre-2.0 firmware). These will be essential when scripting in Met/Cal

 

2) A Met/Cal reference manual. If you are using the newest version, I am told the help files are where the most current manual now exists. Learn the FSC's. These are Function commands that act as shorthand for programming. For example, using your 3458 will not require you to actually send IEEE commands to the unit (so you can put that hefty manual away) because Met/Cal already has an FSC that will send the commands to it for you. Handy!

 

3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc. 

 

4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it. 

 

But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there. 

 

Dexter

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Avatar
Dexter

<p>Hi David, glad you could join us. Your questions are kind of vague and a little beyond the scope of this forum but I too recently taught myself Met/Cal and it seems you are at a level where I might be able to help you out. Send me an e-mail and I can help guide you from there. But here are some good places to start.&nbsp;</p><p>1) Manuals - Every instrument that has a communication interface will have a manual that also gives you the command structure for that device. They wouldn't all be the same. Some use IEEE-488-1978, Some use IEEE-488.2-1987, some use a proprietary command structure and others just speak gibberish (glares at the Fluke 725 pre-2.0 firmware). These will be essential when scripting in Met/Cal</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>2) A Met/Cal reference manual. If you are using the newest version, I am told the help files are where the most current manual now exists. Learn the FSC's. These are Function commands that act as shorthand for programming. For example, using your 3458 will not require you to actually send IEEE commands to the unit (so you can put that hefty manual away) because Met/Cal already has an FSC that will send the commands to it for you. Handy!</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Dexter</p>

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Dexter
3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc. 4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it. But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there. Dexter
0
Avatar
Dexter
Hi David, glad you could join us. Your questions are kind of vague and a little beyond the scope of this forum but I too recently taught myself Met/Cal and it seems you are at a level where I might be able to help you out. Send me an e-mail and I can help guide you from there. But here are some good places to start. 1) Manuals - Every instrument that has a communication interface will have a manual that also gives you the command structure for that device. They wouldn't all be the same. Some use IEEE-488-1978, Some use IEEE-488.2-1987, some use a proprietary command structure and others just speak gibberish (glares at the Fluke 725 pre-2.0 firmware). These will be essential when scripting 2) A Met/Cal reference manual. If you are using the newest version, I am told the help files are where the most current manual now exists. Learn the FSC's. These are Function commands that act as shorthand for programming. For example, using your 3458 will not require you to actually send IEEE commands to the unit (so you can put that hefty manual away) because Met/Cal already has an FSC that will send the commands to it for you. Handy! 3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc. 4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it.
0
Avatar
Dexter
Hi David, glad you could join us. Your questions are kind of vague and a little beyond the scope of this forum but I too recently taught myself Met/Cal and it seems you are at a level where I might be able to help you out. Send me an e-mail and I can help guide you from there. But here are some good places to start. 1) Manuals - Every instrument that has a communication interface will have a manual that also gives you the command structure for that device. They wouldn't all be the same. Some use IEEE-488-1978, Some use IEEE-488.2-1987, some use a proprietary command structure and others just speak gibberish (glares at the Fluke 725 pre-2.0 firmware). These will be essential when scripting 2) A Met/Cal reference manual. If you are using the newest version, I am told the help files are where the most current manual now exists. Learn the FSC's. These are Function commands that act as shorthand for programming. For example, using your 3458 will not require you to actually send IEEE commands to the unit (so you can put that hefty manual away) because Met/Cal already has an FSC that will send the commands to it for you. Handy!
0
Avatar
Dexter
3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc.
 
4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it.
 
But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there.
 
Dexter
0
Avatar
Dexter
3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc. 4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it. But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there.
0
Avatar
Dexter
3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc. 4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it.
0
Avatar
Dexter

3) If you have never done any scripting prior to this point and you find that you don't have an innate aptitude for it, try to get your company to send you to Met/Cal training. If, like me, your company is cheap and unreasonable, then try learning a language like Python (I recommend the book, Learn Python the Hard Way). It's not quite like Met/Cal, but it'll teach you some fundamentals about scripting like calling functions, writing loops, invoking math functions, etc.

0
Avatar
Dexter
4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it.
 
But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there.
 
Dexter
0
Avatar
Dexter
4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it. But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there.
 
Dexter
0
Avatar
Dexter
4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it. But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there.
0
Avatar
Dexter
4) Understand that 10% of the work is writing the script. 90% is troubleshooting what you wrote. Don't get cocky if you wrote a whole procedure in a day. It'll take at least two more to fix it.
 
But otherwise, send me an e-mail and I will do my best to guide you from there.
0
Avatar
David Mix

Hello Dexter...

Thanks for your fast response.

About your answers:

1) I know that all the instrument has a list of commands for remote control by Any port. Anyway y have some manuals where to start with.

2) I always use the manual of the software to find usefull information about the command syntax, how to use them, etc.

3) I have abut 3 Months modifying the procedures that we download from MET/GOLD support Web Page. I will look for that book about Phyton.

Then, in general, I'm sorry for my poor information, but i've been working a lot and i don't have much time to do "Experiments" and learn to write FSC for the instruments. Anyway i apreciate a lot your answer.

I'm sorry if my English is Poor, but from here in Chile, i feel proud because im not using a translator for writing and reading all the information.

Once Again Dexter... Thanks for your Answer!! Have a nice day.

I'll be waiting for more answers.

Best regards.

David Mix Fuentes - DTS's Calibration Team.

(I can read spanish too!! - Puedo leer el español tambien!)

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Dale Chaudiere

Are you a MET/SUPPORT Gold member?  If so you can download the verification procedure for the 3456A.  It contains IEEE statements to control the 3456A.

Did you mean Keithley 2002, rather than Keysight 2002?

If it is the Keithley 2002, use the 2002 FSC or Flexible DMM driver, if it is being used as a reference.  If it is the DUT/UUT, download the verification procedure for the 2002.

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David Mix
Hello Dale... Thanks for your response. I've been checking the accuracy file of the keithley 2002 and it doesn't match the specifications of the Catalog manual. The same is happening with the HP 3458A. So we'll send an email to fluke so we can request an explanation about it. I'll tell you when we get an answer. Greetings. David Mix.
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Michael Schwartz

If you are talking about using the Keysght USB 2002A Power Sensors.   You will have to jump through some hoops.  I had to write some executables that allowed me to communicate with VISA devices as standards. 

Mike

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